In the Media

Celebs back Houston with contributions

Three-time Emmy Award winner Jim Parsons, the star of "The Big Bang Theory," one of the most successful situation comedies on network TV. For the past few years the actor who grew up in Spring and graduated from the University of Houston has given $300,000 to the Catastrophic Theatre, where he performed many times early in his career.

Jason Nodler, Catastrophic's artistic director, says he met Parsons at an audition in 1995, when the company was known as Infernal Bridegroom Productions.

"We knew right away we were going to cast him," Nodler says. "He was really wonderful."

After four years with Infernal Bridegroom, Parsons attended graduate school in San Diego, then moved to New York and eventually landed the part of a lifetime. It came with some cash to spare.

"Back when we were making plays together, pretty much growing up together, we would have dreamed of having an angel like Jim," Nodler said. "We didn't realize he was just on the next bar stool over. Of course we're very grateful. Jim's told me he thinks of his support as a way of remaining a part of our work."

Meet the writer/director/star of 'A Very Tamarie Christmas'

Cooper's annual, original summer musical has become as much a tradition of Houston's entertainment scene as - well, as fruitcake during the holiday season. A good deal more digestible, too.

For the 17th time, Cooper has conceived, directed, choreographed and co-written a zany and freewheeling show that uses a particular topic as its satiric launching pad, then branches out to kid everything else it can work into the general pattern. In past shows, Cooper (who also stars in her creations) and her collaborators (including some of Houston's most original creative and performing talents) have skewered everything from patriotism to parenthood, the pitfalls of love to the workings of the mind.

Middletown – Review

The play unfolds in a succession of interactions between the quirky characters of the nowhere and everywhere town of Middletown. The houses may look like they come from the set of Leave it to Beaver and the music that populates the play might have come from a 60’s Tupperware commercial, but the townsfolk of Middletown are anything but shiny, happy people.

First-time Director Kyle Sturdivant Navigates the Deep End of the Pool in Middletown

Actor-turned-first-time-director Kyle Sturdivant had one particular problem in working on Will Eno's Middletown - directing himself. Sturdivant, long associated with Catastrophic Theatre, tells us, "I don't like working with me. I don't recommend it. I don't have enough self-confidence to turn on a dime from the knowing director to the actor filled with self-doubt and strange characteristics."